The Teachers and Training Moments That Shaped NYCB’s Newest Soloist
January 18, 2021

Former Houston Ballet dancer Chun Wai Chan has always been destined for New York City Ballet.

While competing at Prix de Lausanne in 2010, he was offered summer program scholarships at both the School of American Ballet and Houston Ballet. However, because two of the competition’s winners that year were Houston Ballet’s Aaron Sharratt and Liao Xiang, dancers Chan idolized, he turned down SAB. He joined Houston Ballet II in 2010, the main company’s corps de ballet in 2012, and was promoted to principal in 2017. Oozing confidence and technical prowess, Chan was a Houston favorite, and even landed himself a spot on Dance Magazine‘s “25 to Watch.”

In 2019, NYCB came calling: Resident choreographer Justin Peck visited Houston Ballet to set a new work titled Reflections. Peck immediately took to Chan and passed his praises on to NYCB artistic director Jonathan Stafford. Chan was invited to take class with NYCB for three days in January 2020, and shortly thereafter was offered a soloist contract.

The plan was to announce his hiring in the spring for the fall season that typically begins in September, but, of course, coronavirus postponed the opportunity to next year. Chan is currently riding out the pandemic in Huizhou, Guangdong, China, where he was born and trained at the Guangzhou Art School.

We talked to Chan about his training journey—and the teachers, corrections and experiences that got him to NYCB.

On the most helpful correction he’s ever gotten:

“Work smart, then work hard to keep your body healthy. Most of us get injuries when we’re tired. When I first joined Houston Ballet, I was pushing myself 100 percent every day, at every show, rehearsal and class. That’s when I got injured [a torn thumb ligament, tendinitis and a sprained ankle.] At that time, my director taught me that we all have to work hard, memorize the steps and take corrections, but it’s better to think first because your energy is limited.”

How it’s benefited his career since:

“It’s the secret to me getting promoted to principal very quickly. When other dancers were injured or couldn’t perform, I was healthy and could step up to fill a higher role than my position. I still get small injuries, but I know how to take care of them now, and when it’s OK to gamble a little.”

On his most influential teacher:

“Claudio Muñoz, from Houston Ballet Academy. The first summer intensive there I couldn’t even lift the lightest girls. A month later, my pas de deux skills improved so much. I never imagined I could lift a girl so many times. A year later I could do all the tricky pas tricks. That’s all because of Claudio. He also taught me how to dance in contemporary, and act all kinds of characters.”

How he gained strength for partnering:

“I did a lot of push-ups. Claudio recommended dancers go to the gym. We don’t have those kinds of traditions in China, but after Houston Ballet, going to the gym has become a habit.”

On his YouTube channel:

“I started a YouTube channel, where I could give ballet tutorials. Many male students only have female teachers, and they are missing out on the guy’s perspective on jumps and partnering. I give those tips online because they are what I would have wanted. My goal is to help students have strong technique so they are able to enjoy the stage as much as they can.”

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